Myths about drug usage and charges

On Behalf of | Aug 31, 2022 | Criminal Defense |

Many myths exist surrounding drug usage and charges. These likely stem from the outdated idea that drug usage is a mistake that officials need to punish rather than a multifactorial health disorder.

People need to learn to identify what is not factual about drug use so that they can combat them. Here are some of the more popular myths surrounding drug usage and charges.

People with drug problems make bad choices

Drug addiction is a multifactorial health disorder. That means it is a disorder that occurs due to various factors. These include an individual’s environment, mental health status and genetics. Therefore, drug problems are often caused by more than a wrong choice.

Drugs affect women and men equally

Women and men metabolize drugs differently. Therefore, women tend to have more health risks due to drug usage. Additionally, women are more likely to end up in prison. This statistic likely occurs due to gender discrimination and stigmas.

Using psychoactive medicines is safe

A doctor can prescribe psychoactive medicines and a pharmacist can administer them. Under these regulations, people can safely use these medicines and avoid abusing them. However, individuals who overuse them or obtain them illegally endanger their health. People must follow the FDA medication guides to use their prescriptions correctly.

The government prohibits all drug usage

The government has legalized the controlled use of certain substances that have crucial benefits in pain management and other medical treatments. Individuals using these substances with a proper prescription cannot receive drug charges when they use them appropriately. However, overusing or illegally obtaining these substances can result in drug charges.

Knowing these myths can help people learn to differentiate fact from fiction regarding drug usage. That will help them avoid miscategorizing people or overlooking medical disorders.

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