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Weapons Offenses Archives

Get an understanding before you make defense decisions

Criminal charges related to weapons are serious legal matters. These charges are almost always classified as violent crimes, which means that the life effects of a conviction might be more than what you initially expected. We can help you find out how a conviction might impact your life, as well as discovering any possible defense options that you might have.

Aggravated assault charges can stem from various circumstances

Being charged with assault is bad enough in itself, but a charge of aggravated assault is even worse. Aggravated assault occurs when there are extenuating circumstances associated with the assault. For example, you might face this charge if you beat someone with something that could be considered a weapon, such as a brick.

Weapons charges require you to think carefully about a defense

Gun charges are serious and can land you in prison for a long time. When you are facing these charges, your defense must be carefully planned. You can't wait until the last minute and think that you can just throw something together. Trying to put off the defense planning might be a devastating decision.

Missouri law forbids brass knuckles in almost all circumstances

Protecting yourself if you get into a fight is something that anyone would want to do. It is important for you to know that how you protect yourself matters. Missouri laws sets some very harsh penalties for weapons-related crimes, so if you are facing one of these charges, you should learn all you can about the elements of the case.

Carrying a knife in Missouri: What is legal?

When we talk about weapons charges, most people automatically consider the implications of carrying or owning certain firearms. Guns are not the only thing considered to be a weapon, though, and you can get into legal trouble by carrying or owning certain types of knives.

Governor shoots down concealed carry bill

Weapons offenses are very serious offenses that can lead to significant time in prison. People in Missouri who were hoping that carrying a concealed weapon would be a little easier now have had their hopes dashed. Governor Nixon opted to veto a bill that would have allowed people to carry a concealed weapon without having to obtain a permit.

Keeping track of all laws can be difficult for most people

Anyone who is accused of breaking the law can face criminal charges. This is true even if someone knows the law. For people who carry a firearm, knowing all the laws pertaining to firearms can be difficult. This can mean that you might face criminal charges for doing something you didn't realize was wrong.

Sheriff faces felony weapons charge after tavern incident

People who carry weapons are expected to act in a responsible manner when they have the weapon on their person. In fact, many of the duties of a gun owner are spelled out in the Missouri laws concerning guns. It is important to note that all gun owners are responsible for following the law. One point that must be adhered to by all people who carry a firearm, including civilians and law enforcement officials, is that you can't be in possession of a firearm while consuming alcoholic beverages.

Know Missouri gun laws to stay out of trouble

In our previous post, we discussed how federal weapons convictions have declined in the past decade. While it is important for people to know the federal gun laws, it is also important for Missouri residents to know about some of the state laws pertaining to weapons. We know that navigating through the laws to determine what is legal can be rather difficult. If you are facing a weapons charge, we can help you learn what went wrong and how to defend yourself against the charges.

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